Week 9/Day 5 Cardiogolf Game Improvement Program

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KPJ’s Game Improvement Program

Monday-Pre-Round Warm up

Tuesday-Arm Workout

Wednesday-Body Motion

Thursday-Golf Specific Stretches

Today-Friday-Golf-Specific Core Work

Golf-Specific Core Work

To create power and speed in your golf swing, it is important to stretch and strengthen your core muscles or trunk.  Your core consists of muscles in your abdominal, back, hips and chest. A strong, flexible core allows you to turn your trunk for a complete range of motion.

On-Course Exercise-

Trunk Rotation-Stand in your golf posture with a golf club behind your shoulders.  Slowly complete your backswing and follow-through as if you were swinging a golf club.

Off-Course Exercise-

Daily Core Workout

1. Medicine Ball Toss-Hold medicine ball in golf posture and simulate a golf swing.

2. Back Extension on Swiss Ball-On Swiss Ball, extend back. Use wall as an assist.

3. Russian Twists-Standing straight, rotate medicine ball side to side.

4. Plank-Hold for 30 seconds.

5. Dead Lifts-Keeping legs straight, bend from hip sockets.

6. Wood Chops-Swing medicine ball across the body, repeat on the opposite side.

Do each exercise for 8 to repetitions working up to 3 sets of each exercise.

Preview Cardiogolf

Find out your golf personality

Email me your questions and comments-kpj@swingbladegolf.com

2010 Boston Golf Expo

Come see Karen at this year’s Boston Golf Expo March 5-7.  Karen, once again, will take to the seminar stage to dish out tips and advice including:

  1. Shape Up Your Body: Improve Your Golf Game-Golf Specific Exercises
  2. How to Practice to Groove a Consistent Golf Swing
  3. Increase Flexibility: Increase Distance-Golf Specific Stretches
  4. Cure Your Slice
  5. The New Golf Swing for Women

For more information and directions visit-paragonexpo.com

Week 9/Day 4 Cardiogolf Game Improvement Program

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KPJ’s Game Improvement Program

Monday-Pre-Round Warm up

Tuesday-Arm Workout

Wednesday-Body Motion

Today-Thursday-Golf Specific Stretches

Friday-Golf Specific Core Work

Golf Specific Stretches

For most of us, spring is just around the corner.  Take some time, before the season begins, to examine one of the key areas of your golf swing to make sure that your fundamentals are correct to not only prevent injury, but to get back to your desired level of golf more quickly.

One of the most basic fundamentals that is overlooked is posture.  Specifically, how we set up to the ball.  Ideally, as you address the ball, your back should be relatively straight and your shoulders pulled back and relaxed, not hunched over and tight. One of the most common swing faults is “slumped” shoulders at address position.  When your shoulders are rounded or slumped, you will not able to rotate and turn properly.

Take a look at your address position and examine your upper back.  Are your shoulders pulled back or are they hunched over?  If they are hunched over, you should take care to do a few exercises to correct your muscle imbalances.

On-Course Exercise-Get into the habit of warming up and doing at least two golf-specific stretches before you play or practice. Once you have completed a general warm-up then you are ready to move into the golf specific phase of the warm-up.  This is also known as movement rehearsal.  We are literally rehearsing the moves will be doing in the golf swing. Research says those who warmed up specifically for the movement they are going to be performing for the day did better than those who did not just did general stretches.

Off-Course Exercise-Here is a very easy exercise that can be done on a daily basis to help correct “slumped” shoulders.

Chest and Upper Back Extension Exercise

Step 1: Stand with your feet shoulder width apart, arms hanging by your sides.

Step 2: Clasp your hands behind your back.

Step 3: Inhale and press your shoulder blades together. You should feel a stretch in your chest and upper back.

Step 4: Hold stretch for 10 to 15 seconds, release and repeat exercise.

You can do this exercise several times a day
You can do this exercise several times a day

You can do this exercise several times throughout the day to stretch and strengthen your muscles and help you correct “slumped” shoulders so that you can turn more freely in your golf swing.

Preview Cardiogolf

Find out your golf personality

Email me your questions and comments-kpj@swingbladegolf.com

2010 Boston Golf Expo

Come see Karen at this year’s Boston Golf Expo March 5-7.  Karen, once again, will take to the seminar stage to dish out tips and advice including:

  1. Shape Up Your Body: Improve Your Golf Game-Golf Specific Exercises
  2. How to Practice to Groove a Consistent Golf Swing
  3. Increase Flexibility: Increase Distance-Golf Specific Stretches
  4. Cure Your Slice
  5. The New Golf Swing for Women

For more information and directions visit-paragonexpo.com

Week 9/Day 3 Cardiogolf Game Improvement Program

Cover jegp

KPJ’s Game Improvement Program

Monday-Pre-Round Warm up

Tuesday-Arm Workout

Today-Wednesday-Body Motion

Thursday-Golf Specific Stretches

Friday-Golf Specific Core Work

Body Motion

Now that you have learned how to grip and setup correctly and understand how your hand, wrist and arm action square the club at impact, you need to learn to move your body to put power into your swing. To get the feeling of a full swing, it is best to practice without a club. My mentor, Jim McLean, puts a huge emphasis on the importance of correct body motion. Your body ultimately influences the path of your club at impact, which we already know affects the initial flight of the ball. If you want to become a more consistent ball striker, you better learn to move your body correctly.

Backswing

Your shoulders wind perpendicular to your spine angle, and they turn so they are at a 90-degree angle to your target line. Of course, you may lack flexibility to make a complete 90-degree turn, so just think of turning your shoulders twice as far as your hips turn. Try to turn your left shoulder (if you are right-handed) over your right knee.

Downswing

After you have loaded your body weight into your right foot, you immediately shift your lower body back to the left as your upper body momentarily stays put. Specifically, your left hip bumps toward the target, which makes your right shoulder drop down. Once this move has taken place, you can complete the sequence by turning your right side through to the finish.

Common mistakes

On the backswing, you are just trying to turn to get your arms in position at the top of the swing. It is not necessary to lift, heave, lunge or over-turn on the back swing. In fact, most higher-handicappers overdo the things they are supposed to do on the back swing. Be careful not to over-turn on the back swing and raise your body up out of the original angle. If you raise up out of your posture then you will have to do something drastic on the downswing to compensate, usually resulting in fat or thin shots. Practice the body motion drill often to make it a part of your swing. The more effectively and efficiently you can shift your weight, the more consistent ball striker you will become.

On-Course Exercise

Before play or practice perform this body motion drill that will not only help you shift your weight, but is a great way to warm up as well.

Standing without a club, assume a good set up. As you do these exercises, remember that we are practicing to hit a golf ball. Always stay in your spine angle and keep your vision down where the ball would be.

You can crisscross your arms over your chest, put your hands in your pockets, or put your hands behind your back.

From here, think of winding your upper body over the resistance of your lower body. If your knees are pinched in slightly at address, it’s easy to feel the weight stay on the inside of your right foot. You want the weight of your lower body to shift so it ends up positioned over your right hip, leg and foot.

Set up with club behind your back
Set up with club behind your back
Backswing turn
Backswing turn
Downswing shift and follow-through
Downswing shift and follow-through

Exercise

Do the Body Motion chapter in the Cardiogolf DVD.  To get your own DVD visit www.cardiogolf.com.

The best way to work on your body motion is to do it indoors where you can look at yourself in the mirror.  You can do the same body motion indoors as you do outdoors.  Practicing this on a regular basis will help your swing become more efficient and fluid. The Body Motion chapter in Cardiogolf will guide you through the correct motion and give you a quick way to warm up before you play or practice.

Setup
Setup
Backswing
Backswing
Downswing and Follow-through
Downswing and Follow-through

Preview Cardiogolf

Find out your golf personality

Email me your questions and comments-kpj@swingbladegolf.com

2010 Boston Golf Expo

Come see Karen at this year’s Boston Golf Expo March 5-7.  Karen, once again, will take to the seminar stage to dish out tips and advice including:

  1. Shape Up Your Body: Improve Your Golf Game-Golf Specific Exercises
  2. How to Practice to Groove a Consistent Golf Swing
  3. Increase Flexibility: Increase Distance-Golf Specific Stretches
  4. Cure Your Slice
  5. The New Golf Swing for Women

For more information and directions visit-paragonexpo.com

Karen to Appear at Boston Golf Expo this Weekend

2010 Boston Golf Expo

Come see Karen at this year’s Boston Golf Expo March 5-7.  Karen, once again, will take to the seminar stage to dish out tips and advice including:

  1. Shape Up Your Body: Improve Your Golf Game-Golf Specific Exercises
  2. How to Practice to Groove a Consistent Golf Swing
  3. Increase Flexibility: Increase Distance-Golf Specific Stretches
  4. Cure Your Slice
  5. The New Golf Swing for Women

For more information and directions visit-paragonexpo.com

Karen will demonstrate golf and golf fitness tips at Boston Golf Expo
Karen will demonstrate golf and golf fitness tips at Boston Golf Expo

Week 9/Day 2 Cardiogolf Game Improvement Program

Cover jegp

KPJ’s Game Improvement Program

Monday-Pre-Swing Warm up

Today-Tuesday-Arm Workout

Wednesday-Body Motion

Thursday-Golf Specific Stretches

Friday-Golf Specific Core Work

Arm Workout

Focus on the lead arm for solid shots

The golf swing in its most simple form is really only a circle. The radius of that circle, back and through the swing is the lead are (left arm for a right-handed swing and right arm in a left-handed swing). Good players create a wide arc on the backswing and maintain the radius that they created at address throughout the swing. High-handicappers, on the other hand, in their attempt to create a wide arc usually over do it by over swinging and bending their lead arm at the top of the swing, which is the opposite of what they should do.

When a wide arc is established at the top of the swing, the player is now able to drop their arms in the correct position on the downswing which allows the left arm to release through impact and fold correctly on the follow-through. The left arm folding on the follow-through keeps the club on the correct plane and the ball on the target line.

A high-handicapper that collapses his lead arm at the top of the swing is now out of position and has to throw the club from the outside on the downswing. From this position he tries to save the shot by extending the lead arm on the follow-through, once again, the opposite of what one should do, resulting in the dreaded chicken wing follow-through where the elbow points up instead of down destroying the radius of the circle.

Good ball strikers keep their lead arm straight
Good ball strikers keep their lead arm straight
If you bend your lead arm, you loose the radius of your swing.
If you bend your lead arm, you loose the radius of your swing.

Good ball strikers create a wide arc on the backswing because they accomplish a couple of things:

1) As they swing back, they naturally hinge their wrists, which puts the club on the proper plane
2) They are flexible enough to make a full turn while maintaining the lead arm extended.

High-handicappers tend to do the opposite:
1) Because of a faulty grip they are unable to hinge their wrists properly and then usually end up hinging their elbows instead
2)Because they may not be as flexible, they are unable to make a full turn so they cannot keep the left arm extended so they bend the arm instead.

You don’t need to swing exactly like a tour player to strike the ball well, but don’t do the exact opposite. Keep the lead arm extended on the backswing and let it fold on the follow-through. If you have been struggling to hit solid iron shots, focus on your lead arm.

On-Course Exercise-

Remember a faulty grip can inhibit how much you can hinge your wrists, so check your grip frequently.  Also be careful not to grip the club too tightly.  Tight grip pressure can cause tension in your hands, wrists and forearms and prevent you from hinging and releasing the club.  On a scale of 1 to 10: 10 being the tightest grip pressure you can have and 1 being the loosest grip you can have, your grip pressure should be a 4 or 5 on the scale.  Simply waggling the club before you hit your shot can help you loosen up your grip pressure.

Off-Course Exercise

Here is a simple drill to help you keep your left arm (right arm for left-handed golfers) straight on the back swing.  Using your Cardio Club because it is light weight, hold it just with your left hand grip. To order your own Cardio Club visit Cardiogolf.  Grab your left wrist with your right hand as shown in the picture.  Holding your left wrist, swing the club to the top of your swing keeping your left arm as straight as possible.  Pull your arm straight with your right hand.  Doing this a few times a week can help stretch out your arms and shoulders and train yourself to keep your lead arm straight.

Hold your left wrist with your right hand.
Hold your left wrist with your right hand.
Pull your left arm straight at the top of your swing.
Pull your left arm straight at the top of your swing.

Preview Cardiogolf

Find out your golf personality

Coming Up This Week

Wednesday-Body Motion

Thursday-Golf Specific Stretches

Friday-Golf Specific Core Work

Email me your questions and comments to KPJ@swingbladegolf.com.

I teach Golf and Pilates. I am a LPGA Master Professional and Certified Personal and Pilates Trainer