Week 3/Day 1 Cardiogolf Game Improvement Program

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KPJ’s Cardiogolf Game Improvement Program

Coming up this week…

Today-Monday-Putting Set Up

Tuesday-The Putting Stroke

Wednesday-Reading Greens

Thursday-Distance Control

Friday-Putting Drills

Putting Set Up

Can you believe that we are already on the 3 week of our game improvement program? Remember that doing something positive everyday like exercise or reflection will help not only improve your golf game, but will also help you improve your disposition and quality of life.  Take the time to do something good for yourself like improving your golf skills.

This week we will focus on putting skills.  Putting is 40% of your score.  It is crucial that you become a proficient putter to be a good golfer.  Nothing is more frustrating than hitting two great shots into a par 4 hole and then walking away from the green with a 5 because of a 3-putt.

Every golfer has a chance to become an excellent putter.  It does not take extraordinary physical skill, strength or coordination.  You should try to become the become a great putter.  Improving my putting is always a goal of mine. Good putting skills allow you to make birdies when you hit greens in regulation and save par when you miss greens and don’t chip it close.

To become a great putter you just need to master a few basic fundamentals.  Although there are many different styles of putting, most great putters have a basic fundamentals in common.  If you are already a great putter, then continue to keep doing what you are doing.  But if you could use some help, try to incorporate some of these skills into your game.

The putting stroke can be a very individualistic  process for each person but within that there are certain fundamentals that all great putters have. Proper fundamentals will allow for the easiest possible way to achieve the correct feel and touch.

The first priority is to obtain the correct grip and posture.

The hands need to oppose each other while both thumbs should set strainght down the grip, so the grip sits up in the palm.  Although Phil Mickleson advocates that the grip should be more in the fingers.  He feels that this grip will help you release the putter head, while other pros think that the grip in the fingers will cause too much hand action.  So you will have to experiment for yourself. Try it both ways and see what works for you.  I personally teach that the grip should be in up in the palms, but who am I to argue with Phil Mickelson.  Like  I said, putting is very individualistic.

Here are some other keys:

1. Eyes over the line of the putt.

2. Square alignment with your eyes, shoulders, hips, feet and even forearms parallel to your target line.

3. Arms hang down naturally.

4. Weight slightly on your front leg.

5. Hands slightly pressed forward.

6. Relaxed and light grip pressure as well as softness in your arms and shoulders.

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On-Course Exercise

To achieve the fundamentals of a good stroke, the key to becoming a good putter is quality practice.  It is not necessary to spend hours on the green. Even practicing for 2 to 3 minutes is better than no practice at all. Make it a goal of your to always hit a few practice putts whenever you play or practice. This week I will be giving you a couple of drills to use while you practice.

Off-Course Exercise

Putting indoors is one of the best ways to get touch and feel.  You can simply keep a putter in your living room and take practice putting strokes.  Work on your grip, try to keep your head still and make an effort to strike your putts solidly. If you can, roll a few putts on carpet towards a target to work on your distance control.

Preview Cardiogolf

Find out your golf personality

Coming up this week…

Tuesday-The Putting Stroke

Wednesday-Reading Greens

Thursday-Distance Control

Friday-Putting Drills

Send me your questions comments or concerns. My email is Karen@swingbladegolf.com.

Week 2/Day 5 Cardiogolf Game Improvement Program

KPJ’s Cardiogolf 12-Week Game Improvement Program

WEEK 1-Pre-Swing Set Up

Monday-Grip Essentials

Tuesday-Cardiogolf Warm Up

Wednesday-Body Motion

Thursday-Golf-Specific Stretches

Today Friday-Set up Review

Set Up Review

Everything you do before you swing determines how well you strike the ball. With a poor setup, even the best golfers in the world will not hit the ball straight. Take the time to correctly set up each time for a consistent swing.

*A quality set up is completely relaxed and tension free.

*The stance is about shoulder width, providing a stable base from which to swing.

*Bending from the hip sockets as opposed to the waist will allow you to make a powerful body coil.

*Flex the knees only slightly.

*Let your arms hang naturally, not too close or too far from the body.

*Your back hand (the right hand for right-handed golfers, the left hand for left-handers) is lower on the club than the front hand. Hence, your back arm, shoulder, and hip will be slightly lower than than the front side.

*Bend from the hip sockets, not your waist.

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On-Course Exercise

Practice your posture with each club. Although clubs are different lengths, the basic golf posture remains the same. One key point to remember is to try to keep your spine in a neutral position, not too straight or not slumped over.  The purpose of the golf posture is to create a position from which you can make an athletic swing.

Off-Course Exercise

Check your set-up and posture in front of a mirror and compare it to a photo of a professional golfer from a golf magazine, make sure your model is similar to your build and stature .

Complete the Pre-Swing Muscle and Joint Warm Up chapter from the Cardiogolf DVD.  To order your own copy of Cardiogolf visit cardiogolf .

Preview Cardiogolf

Find out your golf personality

Have a great weekend. Get out there and play some golf.

Send me your questions comments or concerns. My email is Karen@swingbladegolf.com.

Week 2/Day 4 Cardiogolf Game Improvement Program

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KPJ’s Cardiogolf 12-Week Game Improvement Program

WEEK 2-Squaring the Clubface

Monday-Arm Swing

Tuesday-Cardio Training for Golfers

Wednesday-Body Motion

Thursday-Golf-Specific Stretches

Friday-Set Up Review

Golf-Specific Stretches

Last year golfers suffered approximately 35,000 injuries that required a trip to the emergency room or doctor, according to the National Safety Council.  Contrary to popular belief, golf is a physical game that requires a lot of swinging, twisting, turning, gripping, bending and squatting, which places stress and strain on lower backs, hips, knees, shoulders, hands, wrists and elbows.  Injuries can also occur if you walk and carry your bag, putting you at a higher risk for back, knee and ankle injuries.

The majority of golf injuries are not usually a result of a single traumatic or fluke accident. They are more frequently a result of tissue damage sustained over time from overuse and poor technique. Most golf injuries fall into the general categories of strains, sprains, fractures, and tendonitis.  Since the golf swing emphasizes movements on one side of the body more than the other, playing frequently can inevitably create muscle imbalances that can lead to injuries.  Many injuries can be prevented by being better conditioned.  Stretching on a daily basis is one of the fastest and easiest way to prevent injury, improve your range of motion and extend your golf career.

Throughout the rest of this program, I will be demonstrating golf-specific stretches to help you warm up, prevent injury, increase your range of motion, improve your swing and even help you relax.

Consistency is the key to stretching. It is better to do a few minutes of golf specific stretches everyday, than to wait until you have a couple of hours free at the end of the week. It usually never happens.

On-Course Exercise

Get into the habit of warming up and doing at least two golf-specific stretches before you play or practice.  Here is an example of a golf-specific stretch.

Step 1-Set up holding a golf club in your hands with your right palm up and your left palm down like shown in the photo.

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Step 2-Swing to the top of your swing and hold this position for at least 10 seconds.

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Step 3-Swing to the finish and hold follow-through position for at least 10 seconds.

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Off-Course Exercise

Complete the Pre-Swing Muscle and Joint Warm Up chapter from the Cardiogolf DVD.  To order your own copy of Cardiogolf visit cardiogolf .

Preview Cardiogolf

Find out your golf personality

Coming up this week…

Friday-Set Up Review

Send me your questions comments or concerns. My email is Karen@swingbladegolf.com.

Week 2/Day 3 Cardiogolf Game Improvement Program

WEEK 2-Squaring the Clubface

Monday-Arm Swing

Tuesday-Cardio Training for Golfers

Wednesday-Body Motion

Thursday-Golf-Specific Stretches

Friday-Set Up Review

Body Motion

Now that you have learned how to grip and setup correctly and understand how your hand, wrist and arm action square the club at impact, you need to learn to move your body to put power into your swing. To get the feeling of a full swing, it is best to practice without a club. My mentor, Jim McLean, puts a huge emphasis on the importance of correct body motion. Your body ultimately influences the path of your club at impact, which we already know affects the initial flight of the ball. If you want to become a more consistent ball striker, you better learn to move your body correctly.

Backswing

Your shoulders wind perpendicular to your spine angle, and they turn so they are at a 90-degree angle to your target line. Of course, you may lack flexibility to make a complete 90-degree turn, so just think of turning your shoulders twice as far as your hips turn. Try to turn your left shoulder (if you are right-handed) over your right knee.

Downswing

After you have loaded your body weight into your right foot, you immediately shift your lower body back to the left as your upper body momentarily stays put. Specifically, your left hip bumps toward the target, which makes your right shoulder drop down. Once this move has taken place, you can complete the sequence by turning your right side through to the finish.

Common mistakes

On the backswing, you are just trying to turn to get your arms in position at the top of the swing. It is not necessary to lift, heave, lunge or over-turn on the back swing. In fact, most higher-handicappers overdo the things they are supposed to do on the back swing. Be careful not to over-turn on the back swing and raise your body up out of the original angle. If you raise up out of your posture then you will have to do something drastic on the downswing to compensate, usually resulting in fat or thin shots. Practice the body motion drill often to make it a part of your swing. The more effectively and efficiently you can shift your weight, the more consistent ball striker you will become.

On-Course Exercise

Before play or practice perform this body motion drill that will not only help you shift your weight, but is a great way to warm up as well.

Standing without a club, assume a good set up. As you do these exercises, remember that we are practicing to hit a golf ball. Always stay in your spine angle and keep your vision down where the ball would be.

You can crisscross your arms over your chest, put your hands in your pockets, or put your hands behind your back.

From here, think of winding your upper body over the resistance of your lower body. If your knees are pinched in slightly at address, it’s easy to feel the weight stay on the inside of your right foot. You want the weight of your lower body to shift so it ends up positioned over your right hip, leg and foot.

Exercise

Do the Body Motion chapter in the Cardiogolf DVD.  To get your own DVD visit www.cardiogolf.com.

The best way to work on your body motion is to do it indoors where you can look at yourself in the mirror.  You can do the same body motion indoors as you do outdoors.  Practicing this on a regular basis will help your swing become more efficient and fluid. The Body Motion chapter in Cardiogolf will guide you through the correct motion and give you a quick way to warm up before you play or practice.

Preview Cardiogolf

Find out your golf personality

Coming up this week…

Thursday-Golf-Specific Stretches

Friday-Set Up Review

Send me your questions comments or concerns. My email is Karen@swingbladegolf.com.


Week 2/Day 2 Cardiogolf Game Improvement Program

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KPJ’s Cardiogolf 12-Week Game Improvement Program

WEEK 2-Squaring the Clubface

Monday-Arm Swing

Tuesday-Cardio Training for Golfers

Wednesday-Body Motion

Thursday-Golf-Specific Stretches

Friday-Set Up Review

Cardio Training for Golfers

What is Aerobic Exercise and Why Should Golfers Do It?

For an activity to qualify as aerobic, two factors must be present. First, the activity must last at least 20 minutes. Second, you have to increase your heart rate to at least 70% of your maximum rate during the 20 minutes.

Cardiovascular Benefits:

Aerobic exercise conditions the heart and lungs by increasing the oxygen available to the body and by enabling the heart to use oxygen more efficiently.

Additional Benefits of Aerobic Exercise: In addition to cardiovascular benefits, other benefits of aerobic exercise include:

Control of body fat: Aerobic exercise in conjunction with strength training and a proper diet will reduce body fat.

Increased resistance to fatigue and extra energy

Toned muscles and increased lean body mass

Decreased tension and aid in sleeping

Increased general stamina

Psychological benefits: Exercise improves mood, reduces depression and anxiety.

Keep excess pounds at bay: Combined with a healthy diet, aerobic exercise helps you lose weight — and keep it off.

Increase your stamina: Aerobic exercise may make you tired in the

short term. But over the long term, you’ll enjoy increased stamina and reduced fatigue.

Ward off viral illnesses: Aerobic exercise activates your immune system. This leaves you less susceptible to minor viral illnesses, such as colds and flu.

Reduce health risks: Aerobic exercise reduces the risk of many conditions, including obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, stroke and certain types of cancer. Weight-bearing aerobic exercises, such as walking, reduce the risk of osteoporosis.

Manage chronic conditions: Aerobic exercise helps lower high blood pressure and control blood sugar. If you’ve had a heart attack, aerobic exercise helps prevent subsequent attacks.

Strengthen your heart: A stronger heart doesn’t need to beat as fast. A stronger heart also pumps blood more efficiently, which improves blood flow to all parts of your body.

Keep your arteries clear: Aerobic exercise boosts your high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or “good,” cholesterol and lowers your low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or “bad,” cholesterol. The potential result? Less buildup of plaques in your arteries.

Boost your mood: Aerobic exercise can ease the gloominess of depression, reduce the tension associated with anxiety and promote relaxation.

Stay active and independent as you get older: Aerobic exercise keeps your muscles strong, which can help you maintain mobility as you get older. Aerobic exercise also keeps your mind sharp. At least 30 minutes of aerobic exercise three days a week seems to reduce cognitive decline in older adults.

Live longer: People who participate in regular aerobic exercise appear to live longer than those who don’t exercise regularly.

On-Course Exercise-

Kill two birds with one stone: walk while you play golf. One small change that could help you build your stamina and cardio endurance is to walk while you play golf.  If you can’t walk the entire round or your course requires you to take a cart, try to fit in as much walking into the day as possible.  Walk the couple hundred yards to driving range instead of hoping into the cart.  Walk in between shots when you play. Grab a couple of clubs and walk to your next shot while your partner drives the cart.  Every little bit of movement helps you develop your cardio endurance.

Walk whenever you can
Walk whenever you can

Off-Course Exercise-

Do the Groove Your Swing Chapter of the Cardiogolf DVD.  This section of the DVD will provide you with a low impact workout for you whole body that will help you improve your swing technique, clubhead speed and body and swing motion.  To get your own copy of Cardiogolf visit www.cardiogolf.com.

Cardiogolf DVD
Cardiogolf DVD

Preview Cardiogolf

Find out your golf personality

Coming up this week…

Wednesday-Body Motion

Thursday-Golf-Specific Stretches

Friday-Set Up Review

I teach Golf and Pilates. I am a LPGA Master Professional and Certified Personal and Pilates Trainer