Week 11/Day 1 Cardiogolf Game Improvement Program

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KPJ’s Cardiogolf Game Improvement Program

Heading into the last couple of weeks of the Cardiogolf Game Improvement Program, your focus should be on tightening up all areas of your game so there are no obvious weaknesses and polishing your swing technique so you can concentrate on scoring when you finally get out on the golf course this upcoming season.

During this week, we will focus on refining key scoring areas especially around the green and approach shots.

Don’t neglect your golf fitness.  Continue to practice golf-specific stretches and warm up routines.

Today-Monday-Chipping Practice

Tuesday-Pitching Practice

Wednesday-Putting Practice

Thursday-Short Irons Practice

Friday-Practicing from within 100 yards

Chipping

Chipping Basics:

*The “chip shot” is used to land the ball onto the green as soon as possible.

*Weight on the front foot toward target (60/40) throughout the shot.

*Ball position is placed back of center, towards non-target foot.

* Lean the clubshaft forward toward target.

*Hands stay in front of clubhead as all times throughout the shot.

Up and Down Drill

Develop touch around the greens by simulating on-course play.  Chip one ball toward the flag (a), then take your putter and putt it out (b) as if you were trying to up and down for par on the golf course. Repeat from a variety of spots around the green. This drill will increase your concentration on chip shots and improve your clutch putting.

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Up and Down Drill-Chip one shot, then go putt out as if you were on the golf course. Do this from a variety of spots around the green. This is a great drill to play with a partner.

On-Course Exercise-Set aside 10 minutes of your regular practice session to practice your chipping.

Off-Course Exercise-Complete the Pre-Swing Muscle and Joint Warm Up chapter from the Cardiogolf DVD.  To order your own copy of Cardiogolf visit cardiogolf .

Preview Cardiogolf

Find out your golf personality

Email your questions and comments-KPJ@swingbladegolf.com

Boston Golf Expo/Week 10/Day 5 Cardiogolf Game Improvement Program

Cover jegpKPJ’s Game Improvement Program

I was in Boston this past weekend, dishing out tips and advice at the annual Boston Golf Expo. I would like to  thank all the participants by providing them with a recap of my presentations.  All this week, I have been posting tips and drills that I demonstrated at Golf Expo.

Monday-Shape Your Body Trim Your Score

Tuesday-How to Cure Your Slice

Wednesday-Golf-Specific Warm Up

Thursday-Drills to Groove a Consistent Golf Swing

Today-Friday-The New Golf Swing For Women

The New Golf Swing for Woman

The New Golf Swing for Woman:Hit the Ball Straighter Not Harder for More Distance

To get more distance, try hitting the ball straighter instead of harder.  Concentrate on hitting the ball in the sweetspot of the clubface.  If you have ever hit sweetspot, you know that these shots fly farther thanthe shots you hit off center in the heel or toe.  For every quarter inch you hit the ball outside the sweetspot, you lose 10 yards of distance.  So for maximum power, improve you swing technique to consistently hit the ball in the center of the clubface.

Here are the KPJ Golf elements of the swing that will help you hit the sweetspot of the clubface.

  1. Alignment
  2. Swing Plane
  3. Angle of Attack
  4. Squareness of Contact
  5. Speed

It is impossible to have too many thoughts while you swing, so work on each one of the elements separately and you will soon see an improvement in your ball striking.

1. Alignment

Alignment is the key to consistently hitting the sweetspot.  If you are aligned correctly, you’ll have the confidence to swing aggressively down your target line.  If you look back at my blog archives you will find several alignment tips.

2. Angle of Attack-

Angle of attack is the way the clubhead approaches the ball at impact.  To hit the ball correctly in the sweetspot you must understand how the clubhead should approach the ball. Know the difference between hitting a driver and an iron. With the driver the ball is on a tee, so you want to sweep the ball, with the iron the ball is on the ground so you want to hit down.

3. Plane-

The plane of your swing is simply the angle that your club sits at address.  Each club will have a slightly different plane. If you wind your body correctly, the club should stay on plane back and through.  If you use your body incorrectly, you will not be able to swing the club on plane which will cause the clubhead to approach the ball off center.

4. Squareness of Contact-

To consistently hit the sweetspot for maximum distance, you should strive to swing with a square clubface at all times.  Unless, of course, you are trying to hit an intentional curve ball.

If your grip is correct, then it will be easy to return the clubface square impact.  If you have a faulty grip, then the clubface cannot be squared at impact or you will have to make compensations.  Search my blog archives for grip tips.

5.Speed-

When you have confidence that you can consistently hit the ball in the sweetspot, it is easy to swing the club with speed.  Speed is important because it is what launches the ball airborne.  Rhythm is your golf swings speed.  Rhythm is the momentum created by your swing that generates clubhead speed to give you power and distance.  Think of a child’s swing, once it is swung back, it will reach the top then almost stop.  Then it will change direction and start down on its own, picking up speed.  Imagine your golf swing as one flowing motion, never as a series of jerky starts and stops.  Let the clubhead accelerate through impact, all the way to the finish without interrupting the motion or trying to slow it down.

My Cardiogolf DVD is an excellent way to learn how to create clubhead speed. To order click here-www.cardiogolf.com

On-Course Exercise

Before play or practice perform this body motion drill that will not only help you shift your weight, but is a great way to warm up as well.

Standing without a club, assume a good set up. As you do these exercises, remember that we are practicing to hit a golf ball. Always stay in your spine angle and keep your vision down where the ball would be.

You can crisscross your arms over your chest, put your hands in your pockets, or put your hands behind your back.

From here, think of winding your upper body over the resistance of your lower body. If your knees are pinched in slightly at address, it’s easy to feel the weight stay on the inside of your right foot. You want the weight of your lower body to shift so it ends up positioned over your right hip, leg and foot.

Set up with club behind your back
Set up with club behind your back
Backswing turn
Backswing turn
Downswing shift and follow-through
Downswing shift and follow-through

Exercise

Do the Body Motion chapter in the Cardiogolf DVD.  To get your own DVD visit www.cardiogolf.com.

The best way to work on your body motion is to do it indoors where you can look at yourself in the mirror.  You can do the same body motion indoors as you do outdoors.  Practicing this on a regular basis will help your swing become more efficient and fluid. The Body Motion chapter in Cardiogolf will guide you through the correct motion and give you a quick way to warm up before you play or practice.

Setup
Setup
Backswing
Backswing
Downswing and Follow-through
Downswing and Follow-through

Preview Cardiogolf

Find out your golf personality

Email me your questions and comments-kpj@swingbladegolf.com

Boston Golf Expo Special/Week 10/Day 4 Cardiogolf Game Improvement Program

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KPJ’s Game Improvement Program

I was in Boston this past weekend, dishing out tips and advice at the annual Boston Golf Expo. I would like to  thank all the participants by providing them with a recap of my presentations.  All this week, I have been posting tips and drills that I demonstrated at Golf Expo.

Monday-Shape Your Body Trim Your Score

Tuesday-How to Cure Your Slice

Wednesday-Golf-Specific Warm Up

Today-Thursday-Drills to Groove a Consistent Golf Swing

Friday-The New Golf Swing

Drills to Groove a Consistent Golf Swing

When you practice you want to make sure that 1) you are practicing the right moves and 2) that you are grooving a consistent swing that you can take to the golf course.  You want your swing to become automatic like spelling your name.  When was the last time you spelled your name?  You probably can’t remember because it is automatic, you do it without thought.  Why can’t swinging a golf club be the same way.  Why can’t we make a smooth swing without any thought every single time.  Well, that is because this game is really hard, even pros don’t make a perfect swing every single time. But they are consistent and that is because they have practiced enough that it has become automatic.

One way to get a more automatic swing is to do drills and exercises.  When you repeat drills, you ingrain the feelings and you improve faster.  When you do drills, making several repetitions, your muscles start to get feel and you don’t have to think so much.

Here are a list of drills that I demonstrated at the Boston Golf Expo.  Stay tuned for video of how to do the drills.

  1. Posture Drill- Put club behind back.
  2. Set up Drill-Learn the difference between hitting a driver and iron.
  3. Right Knee-Keep right knee flexed to create resistance.  Rotate around knee.
  4. Set Wrists and Swing Drill-This will get you on correct plane.
  5. Check Swing at Top Drill-Club should fall on your shoulder.
  6. Pump Drill-Pump down to check downswing.
  7. Impact Drill-Swing with heels of ground to keep posture.
  8. Impact Drill-Get rid of release by practicing holding the angle.
  9. Right Arm Only-Swing Rt. Arm only to hold angle.
  10. Left Arm Only-Left arm only to get a solid line at impact.
  11. Towel Drill-To maintain width and left arm straight.
  12. Baseball Swings-Helps with driver and plane of swing, also helps holding the angle.
  13. Weight Shift Drill-Weight shifts in direction club is swing.
  14. Step n swing Drill- For correct sequence.
  15. Feet Together Drill-To learn how arms work. Helps balance and stop coming over the top.
Spend a few minutes before your round to warm up and prevent injury
Spend a few minutes before your round to warm up and prevent injury

On-Course Exercise

Commit to warming up before play or practice. Throughout this program, I will give you several warm up routines to help you prepare for your round and help you prevent injury. Watch this short video to see how you can incorporate Pilates into your game. Click here to watch a short video

Off-Course Exercise

Complete the Pre-Swing Muscle and Joint Warm Up chapter from the Cardiogolf DVD.  To order your own copy of Cardiogolf visit cardiogolf .

Email me your questions and comments to KPJ@swingbladegolf.com.

Boston Golf Expo Special/Week 10/Day 3 Cardiogolf Game Improvement Program

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KPJ’s Game Improvement Program

I was in Boston this past weekend, dishing out tips and advice at the annual Boston Golf Expo. I would like to  thank all the participants by providing them with a recap of my presentations.  All this week, I will post tips and drills that I demonstrated at Golf Expo.

Monday-Shape Your Body Trim Your Score

Tuesday-How to Cure Your Slice

Today-Wednesday-Golf-Specific Warm Up

Thursday-How to Groove a Consistent Golf Swing

Friday-The New Golf Swing

Golf-Specific Warm Up

Preview Cardiogolf

Find out your golf personality

My recommendation for a warm up is to do a few minutes of cardio like  jogging, jumping jacks or even walking.  But I know a lot of us feel silly doing exercise on the driving range.  My advice is to get over it.  Who cares what you look like, especially if it is going to help your game. You know, instead of driving the golf cart to the driving range, send your partner ahead and walk there to get warmed up.  Here is an example of  a 5-minute pre-round warm up and stretch routine that you can do with your golf cart. The great thing about this routine is that it will warm you up, it is specific for golf and if you do it everyday, you could increase your flexibility.

Walk to warm up
Walk to warm up
Shoulder and Back Stretch
Shoulder and Back Stretch
Chest Stretch
Chest Stretch
Quad Stretch
Quad Stretch
Hamstring Stretch
Hamstring Stretch
Rotation
Rotation
Back Stretch
Back Stretch

Hip Stretch
Hip Stretch

Boston Golf Expo Special-Week 10/Day 2 Cardiogolf Game Improvement Program

Cover jegp

KPJ’s Game Improvement Program

I was in Boston all weekend, dishing out tips and advice at the annual Boston Golf Expo. I would like to  thank all the participants by providing them with a recap of my presentations.  All the week, I will post tips and drills that I demonstrated at Golf Expo.

Monday-Shape Your Body Trim Your Score

Today-Tuesday-How to Cure Your Slice

Wednesday-Golf-Specific Exercises

Thursday-How to Groove a Consistent Golf Swing

Friday-The New Golf Swing

How to Cure Your Slice

The Slice is about as frurstrating as the common cold.  There are so many different strands of the slice virus, that you may have to try a lot of things before you find something that works for you.  Today I want to give you a few fixes for you to try to get your swing technique back on track and fix your slice.  Even if you don’t slice, these are good drills and tips for you to practice to perfect your technique.

Drills are a good way to practice because they help you get some feel without a lot of thought.  Simply repeating a drill a few times can help you groove a new move or feel.  I will even do an entire practice session just doing drills to get my swing back on track or when I have played or practiced in a while.  The drills that I am going to show you today are specifically for a slice, but also they are to help you improve your swing technique.  When your swing technique improves your bad shots actually get better and you start to minimize your mistakes. Here are a couple drills specifically for slicing.

The Slot Drill-

There are a lot of ways you can cure your slice, but one of my favorites is to focus on the right elbow—moving it into the “slot” on the downswing. The slot is a position just in front of the right hip, where the right elbow sits under the left, the club swinging on a shallow inside-out arc.

Think of how you would swing a baseball bat at a pitch that comes in chest high. You instinctively know to drop the right elbow under the left. The same holds true for hitting a golf ball. What makes it more difficult is that in baseball your body and the bat swing on the same horizontal plane, but when you bend at the hips to hit a golf shot, the shoulders, arms, hips and club all must move on different planes.

That’s why focusing on your right elbow position is a great thought for slotting the club on the correct plane. This position will soon turn your slice into a draw.

The right elbow drops into the slot
The right elbow drops into the slot

Right Palm Drill-

The goal of any good golf swing is to deliver the clubface square at impact. But few amateurs know how to do that consistently. Learn to do it, and you control the ball.

Here’s a visual concept that will help you: Take your normal grip with your driver and address a ball on a tee. Now open your right hand and rest it along the shaft so the palm is facing the target and your fingers are pointed down. Notice how the palm mirrors the angle of the clubface.

When you take the club back, let the palm go for a ride in that position, resting against the shaft. If you let the clubface rotate naturally, the palm moves underneath the shaft as you swing the club to the top. On the way down, the palm gradually rotates back to impact, occupying the same position it held at address. Keep in mind, the right palm mirrors the clubface: Square up the hand, and you’ll square up the face. Rehearse this a few times, keeping an eye on the palm.

Understanding the relationship between the right palm and the clubface is a great way to fix a slice—it encourages the club to come down inside on a shallower plane, helping to produce a draw.

Think of your right palm as controlling the clubface
Think of your right palm as controlling the clubface

Stop Hanging Back Drill-

If you have too much weight on your back foot at impact — two signs that you do are slicing and hitting behind the ball — practice swinging on a downslope.

Gravity will pull you down the hill as you swing through, so you’ll naturally shift to your front foot.

Swinging downhill should also improve your swing path. Players who hang back tend to cut across the ball because their arms pull inward or flip the club to the left. With your weight moving toward the target, your arms are free to extend down the line (right).

So find a downslope — the front of the practice tee or when you walk off a tee box — and groove that forward shift. You’ll start hitting all your shots more solidly.

Hitting shots on a downhill slope will help you shift your weight
Hitting shots on a downhill slope will help you shift your weight

On-Course Exercise

Commit to warming up before play or practice. Throughout this program, I will give you several warm up routines to help you prepare for your round and help you prevent injury. Watch this short video to see how you can incorporate Pilates into your game. Click here to watch a short video

Off-Course Exercise

Complete the Pre-Swing Muscle and Joint Warm Up chapter from the Cardiogolf DVD.  To order your own copy of Cardiogolf visit cardiogolf

Email me your questions and comments to kpj@swingbladegolf.com

I teach Golf and Pilates. I am a LPGA Master Professional and Certified Personal and Pilates Trainer