Week 1/Day 4 KPJ’s Cardiogolf 12-Week Game Improvement Program

KPJ’s Cardiogolf 12-Week Game Improvement Program

WEEK 1-Pre-Swing Set Up

Monday-Grip Essentials

Tuesday-Cardiogolf Warm Up

Wednesday-Posture Essentials

Today-Thursday-Cardiogolf Arm Workout

Cardiogolf Arm Workout

“The best psychologist in the world is a square clubface at impact,” – Ben Hogan

To be a consistent ball striker, you should strive to swing with a square clubface at all times, unless, of course, you are trying to intentionally curve the ball. Golf is a hard enough game hitting the ball straight, let alone fighting an open or closed clubface at impact.

Watch a good player swing and you almost always see a smooth, rhythmic start to their backswing. So what starts the club back? If you look at the swing as a series of circles, the clubhead makes the biggest circle, followed by the circle the hands make, followed by the circle the body makes as it turns back and forth. So since the clubhead has to travel the farthest, you want to start the clubhead back first.

With a correct grip, your hand and wrist should rotate the clubhead so it stays square to the body throughout the swing. When the club is parallel to the ground, the toe of the club will point up. This is a square clubface. The palm of your right hand and the back of your left hand (if you are right-handed) should end up in what we instructors call the “shake hands” position. As you follow through, again the hands and wrists rotate so that when the club is parallel to the ground once again the toe of the club will point up.

When I was a kid my golf instructor, Bob Ledbetter, had me close my fists and stick out my thumbs as if to hitchhike. Pretending I was hitting a golf ball, he would have me rotate my arms so that at the halfway back point of the swing my thumbs would point up. Then I would finish my swing and my thumbs would again point up after impact on the follow-through. It is a rather simple move and should not be over complicated. To start your swing, think of pushing the clubhead straight back, and as your weight shifts naturally to the back foot, your hands and arms will rotate, keeping the clubface square.

As you continue to swing back, your wrists should start to hinge so that about three-quarters of the way back your arms and club will form the letter “L.”

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At the top of the backswing, the clubface needs to be square as well. The clubface should be parallel or match the same angle of the left arm (for right-handers). If the clubface dangles and the left wrist is cupped, the clubface will be too open. If the clubface is flat or parallel to the ground, then it’s too closed. Have your golf instructor video tape your golf swing to see what your clubhead looks like at the top of your swing. A simple clubface adjustment may make the difference between a straight ball and a hook or slice.

If your clubface is square at the top of your swing, it should be square coming down and through the ball. At impact, the back of the left hand and palm of the right hand should face the target. After the ball is gone, continue to rotate the forearms in conjunction with the body. Don’t go through with an open face or a closed face.

Here is a drill to learn the correct hand and arm motion. Hit balls with your feet together. This drill teaches hand, wrist and arm coordination. If you do this correctly, the ball should fly straight without any curve left or right. This drill is also good to work on balance. If you swing too hard, you will lose your balance.


On-Course Exercise

Make practice swings without a ball aiming at a tee placed in the ground. Allow your wrists to hinge freely on the backswing and then on the follow-through clipping the tee out of the ground.

Off-Course Exercise

Complete the Arm Workout chapter of the Cardiogolf DVD.  To get your own copy of Cardiogolf visit cardiogolf .

Use the Cardio Club to work on your wrist hinge. Check yourself in the mirror to make sure the clubface is square and that you are hinging your wrists. To get a Cardio Club visit cardiogolf .

Coming up this week…

Friday-Ball Position

Preview Cardiogolf

Write Down Your Goals for the New Year

Week 1/Day 3 KPJ’s Cardiogolf 12-Week Game Improvement Program

Cardiogolflogo3KPJ’s Cardiogolf 12-Week Game Improvement Program

WEEK 1-Pre-Swing Set Up

Monday-Grip Essentials

Tuesday-Cardiogolf Warm Up

Today-Wednesday-Posture Essentials

Posture Essentials

Everything you do before you swing determines how well you strike the ball. With a poor setup, even the best golfers in the world will not hit the ball straight. Take the time to correctly set up each time for a consistent swing.

*A quality set up is completely relaxed and tension free.

*The stance is about shoulder width, providing a stable base from which to swing.

*Bending from the hip sockets as opposed to the waist will allow you to make a powerful body coil.

*Flex the knees only slightly.

*Let your arms hang naturally, not too close or too far from the body.

*Your back hand (the right hand for right-handed golfers, the left hand for left-handers) is lower on the club than the front hand. Hence, your back arm, shoulder, and hip will be slightly lower than than the front side.

*Bend from the hip sockets, not your waist.

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On-Course Exercise

Practice your posture with each club. Although clubs are different lengths, the basic golf posture remains the same. One key point to remember is to try to keep your spine in a neutral position, not too straight or not slumped over.  The purpose of the golf posture is to create a position from which you can make an athletic swing.

Off-Course Exercise

Check your set-up and posture in front of a mirror and compare it to a photo of a professional golfer from a golf magazine, make sure your model is similar to your build and stature .

Complete the Pre-Swing Muscle and Joint Warm Up chapter from the Cardiogolf DVD.  To order your own copy of Cardiogolf visit cardiogolf .

Coming up this week…

Thursday-Cardiogolf Arm Workout

Friday-Ball Position

Preview Cardiogolf

Write Down Your Goals for the New Year

Week 1/Day 2-KPJ’s CARDIOGOLF 12-WEEK GAME IMPROVEMENT FITNESS PROGRAM

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WEEK 1-Pre-Swing Set Up

Monday-Grip Essentials

Today-Tuesday-Cardiogolf Warm Up

Warm Up 101-

Essentials to Better Play and Minimizing Risk of Injury

Studies show that 53% of amateur golfers and 30% of professional golfers have sustained an injury while playing golf and most of those injuries actually occurred while hitting balls on the golf course and practicing on the driving range.

Professional golfers have more overuse injuries due to hours of practice while weekend golfers are more likely to get injured from lack of conditioning and poor swing mechanics.  While you may not think that the golf course is a hazardous to your health, there is potential risk of suffering serious injuries to the wrists, elbows, lower back, hips and knees.

Warming up is the easiest and most effective way to prevent injuries that can happen during practice and play.

If you have ever participated in a sport or some form of exercise most likely you performed some type of regular warm up and cool down before and after competition.  So why wouldn’t you warm up before a round of golf or a practice session? Swinging a golf club up to 300 times a round including practice swings at speeds upwards of 90 miles per hour stress our muscles, tendons and joints to full capacity. Injury rates for recreational golfers are at an astounding rate of more than 50% – and even higher for golfers over age of 50. Recreational golfers have typically skipped warming up before play and practice because of the misconception that golf is not a strenuous activity or because of time constraints.  We are all so busy, so when we have time to play golf, we are all anxious to get out on the golf course and we end up skipping the warm up. But skipping the warm up may mean that it takes us four or five holes before we loosen up and gain our form and by that time, our score may already be ruined.  If you had only spent a few minutes warming up before the first tee, you could not only avoid those big numbers on your scorecard the first few holes, but also prevent injury.

Professional golfers now know that a proper warm up is essential for peak performance.  Most recreational golfers quite haven’t caught on with the trend, they typically go straight from their car to the first tee and wonder why they don’t hit a solid shot until the 5th or 6th hole. No matter what level of player you are, a proper warm up can help you play your best golf and prevent injuries.

On-Course Exercise

Commit to warming up before play or practice. Throughout this program, I will give you several warm up routines to help you prepare for your round and help you prevent injury.

Off-Course Exercise

Complete the Pre-Swing Muscle and Joint Warm Up chapter from the Cardiogolf DVD.  To order your own copy of Cardiogolf visit cardiogolf .

Coming up this week…

Wednesday-Posture Essentials

Thursday-Cardiogolf Arm Workout

Friday-Ball Position

Preview Cardiogolf

Write Down Your Goals for the New Year

Week 1/Day 1-KPJ’s CARDIOGOLF 12-WEEK GAME IMPROVEMENT FITNESS PROGRAM

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Scroll Down to Get Started on Your Week 1 Assignments

This FREE program is designed for anyone who wants to improve their golf game and kick-start their golf fitness. Simply sign up for my blog and receive weekly golf and fitness tips that will guide you through a 12-week game improvement program.

For the complete program, you will want to order my Cardiogolf fitness program available at www.cardiogolf.com.

The program officially begins on January 4, 2010.  Sign up for my blog to start improving your game.

The 12-Week Program

During the following 12-week plan you will work on and develop all the key aspects of your game. I will include exercises that can be done indoors as well as practice tips for the driving range. Starting with a full review of the basic fundamentals, you will progress to learning the basic swing motion and then target the areas of the game that will enable you to make the most immediate and noticeable improvement to your scoring. I will also include basic golf fitness exercises that will help accelerate your game improvement.

Each week of the program focuses on a different aspect of the game. I will give you an overview of the technique and then ask you to commit to practicing the exercises and drills during the week.

It is important that you try to perform the recommended exercises on a regular basis.  Consistency is the key to game improvement.

For the complete program, you will want to order my Cardiogolf fitness program available at www.cardiogolf.com.

Let’s get started…

 

WEEK 1-Pre-Swing Set Up

Monday-Grip Essentials

Tuesday-Cardiogolf Warm Up

Wednesday-Posture Essentials

Thursday-Cardiogolf Arm Workout

Friday-Ball Position

The first week of the Cardiogolf Game Improvement Program is devoted entirely to the pre-swing set-up.  Everything you do before you swing determines how well your shot will turn out. You need to review the basics no matter what level golfer you are. Only once you have a solid and consistent set up can you develop other areas of your game like consistency and power.

Spend as much time as you possibly can working on perfecting your set up.  Check your grip, posture and ball position.  Once you have corrected any flaws, then you will want to rehearse setting up in the correct position.  This is something you can do inside or away from the golf course.  It only takes a few minutes to work on these basic fundamentals.

Grip Essentials

Nobody’s hands are the same, so you grip might not be the same as your fellow player’s, but that doesn’t mean it is wrong. How you join your hands together is up to you. There are three basic grip choices to find one that best suits you. Use whatever grip feels comfortable to you. Most importantly, use the grip that helps you square the clubface at impact with the least effort. Experiment with your grip by hitting balls with the different grips to see what works best.

Strive to form a neutral grip.

 

The Vardon Grip: The most widely used grip by golf professionals is called the Vardon grip, named after the grip’s inventor, Harry Vardon. This is where you piggyback the pinkie finger of your right hand on top of the forefinger of your left hand.

The Interlocking Grip: The interlocking grip is where you interlock the pinkie finger of the right hand with the forefinger of the left hand.

Baseball or 10-Finger Grip: This is where all 10 fingers are securely on the shaft, as if you were holding a baseball bat.

Learn to waggle

It is important to get the correct grip pressure before each swing, to keep your swing consistent.

Place your hands on the club and hold the club head just below waist high. The club head should feel heavy. If it feels light, you are gripping way too tightly and your won’t be able to release the club face and hit a good shot.  Make sure the grip pressure is the same in each hand, not tighter in one than the other. Keep the grip pressure the same throughout your swing. Don’t tighten or loosen your hands at the top of your swing, especially not at impact. Learn to waggle. A waggle is a little motion each golfer does before hitting to ensure proper grip pressure and take tension out of her hands and arms. Hold the club above the ground just below waist high. Now make small, controlled clockwise circles with the club head, making sure that your hands stay securely on the shaft. The club head should feel heavy. If it feels light, you are holding it too tightly.  When you are confident that your grip pressure is just right, you are ready to place the club head behind the ball and swing.

On-Course Exercise

Consult your local PGA or LPGA Teaching Professional about your grip.  If you don’t have access to a teaching professional, video tape or take a picture of your grip and email it to me for a free evaluation.

Off-Course Exercise

Watch the Swing Essentials chapter from the Cardiogolf DVD.  To order your own copy of Cardiogolf visit Cardiogolf .

If you can’t make it to the golf course, work on your grip at home. 1. Make sure that you have a club in your office or living room so that you can grab it when you have time.  The Cardio Club is the perfect practice club to keep indoors.  It is shorten so that you can make full swings inside the house and not hit ceilings, furniture and walls. It is available at www.cardiogolf.com. 2. Practice putting your hands on the club whenever you can, even while watching TV. 3. Strive to form a neutral grip and work on keeping your grip pressure light.

Memorizing a neutral grip will eventually free up your mind to work on other areas of your swing.

 

KPJ’s Cardiogolf 12-Week Game Improvement Program

This FREE program is designed for anyone who wants to improve their golf game and kick-start their golf fitness. Simply sign up for my blog and receive weekly golf and fitness tips that will guide you through a 12-week game improvement program. You can subscribe to my blog on this page, simple type in your email address in the box in the right-hand column of this page.

For the complete program, you will want to order my Cardiogolf fitness program available at www.cardiogolf.com.

The program officially begins on January 4, 2010.  Sign up for my blog to start improving your game.

The 12-Week Program

During the following 12-week plan you will work on and develop all the key aspects of your game. I will include exercises that can be done indoors as well as practice tips for the driving range. Starting with a full review of the basic fundamentals, you will progress to learning the basic swing motion and then target the areas of the game that will enable you to make the most immediate and noticeable improvement to your scoring. I will also include basic golf fitness exercises that will help accelerate your game improvement.

Each week of the program focuses on a different aspect of the game. I will give you an overview of the technique and then ask you to commit to practicing the exercises and drills during the week.

It is important that you try to perform the recommended exercises on a regular basis.  Consistency is the key to game improvement.

For the complete program, you will want to order my Cardiogolf fitness program available at www.cardiogolf.com.

 

I teach Golf and Pilates. I am a LPGA Master Professional and Certified Personal and Pilates Trainer